Student Highlight

Robert Jadin

Robert Jadin

I am a Ph.D. student in EBIO studying the natural history and evolutionary relationships of amphibians and reptiles, particularly Neotropical snakes.

These interests form my main areas of research investigations, which are:

  • Evolution of morphological traits over macroevolutionary timescales
  • Patterns of historical and current biodiversity and biogeography
  • Systematics and revising taxonomy
  • Phylogenetic theory
  • Descriptive morphology
  • Expanding distributions of invasive species
  • Natural history and conservation

My research often combines approaches including molecular techniques, morphological analyses of museum specimens, and surveys of the tropics for collecting specimens. To investigate my questions I use morphological and molecular phylogenetics, descriptive morphology, statistics, natural history, and I am expanding my research to include morphometrics and ecological niche modeling. My survey work in the tropics has led me to Bolivia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Panama, and Peru. My primary taxa of interest are Neotropical snakes with an emphasis on Middle American pitvipers but I have also worked on Asian pitvipers, North American garter snakes, invasive geckos of the genus Hemidactylus, and Venezuelan gymnophthalmid lizards. Finally, my hobbies include road cruising on rainy nights, long walks in cloud forest habitats, flipping rocks and logs with herps underneath, writing natural history notes, and inferring phylogenies.

Robert Jadin