Research Opportunities

Research Opportunities working with EBIO Graduate Students

One of the benefits of attending a tier-one research institution is that your professors and TAs are involved in cutting-edge research.  Performing research will allow you to pursue your interests while honing your problem-solving skills. The opportunity to work on a faculty-initiated research project gives you the chance to work closely with graduate students, research associates and faculty members.

You may know that working in a lab is your opportunity to stand apart from the crowd and participate in that research, but you may not know how to get started. Whether you are looking for an educational or employment opportunity, always remember: Be Professional! Before you write or apply you should find out what kind of research is done at the lab.  For example: what organisms or processes does the lab study? Where do they work? (field, lab or a combination). You can learn more about the labs and the assistance they may need by clicking on the lab names in the 'Current Research Opportunities' table below. 

Here are a few tips that can help you make a good impression when you write:

1) Use a formal heading and closing.  If you are addressing a professor, please use Dr.

2) Politely state what you would like to achieve from the experience. Whether you are looking for a specific experience or you simply want to know what opportunities are available, explicitly state your objective in your message.

3) Demonstrate how your interests align with those of your reader's.  Using  2 - 3 sentences, tell your reader why you are interested in working with them and any relevant experiences you may have had such as coursework, hobbies, etc.

5) Be succinct.

6) Some graduate students/professors ask for specific information; be sure you address what they ask for.

Lab Graduate Student Research Contact Information Semester Help Needed
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Breed Helen McCreery Ant behavior, Collective intelligence This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Summer
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Bowman Amy Churchill Plant-soil interactions and alpine ecosystem resilience This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Cruz Marcus S. Cohen Cichlid brood parasitism; general fish lab assistance This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Cruz Nathan Kleist Noise pollution, fitness consequences and stress in cavity nesting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Summer
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Davies  Kika Tarsi Population dynamics in fragmented landscapes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Fierer Gaddy Bergmann Diet and gut microbiome of bison This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Fierer Tobin Hammer Ecology of microbial symbiosis in tropical caterpillars This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Fall
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Johnson Daniel Preston Ecology of disease and invasions in freshwaters This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer
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Johnson Joe Mihalijevic Pathogen ecology and evolution of virulence This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Johnson Max Joseph Conservation, Disease dynamics, Radiotelemetry, fieldwork This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Johnson Katie Richgels Interaction of biodiversity and disease in an ecological framework This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring
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Johnson & Townsed John Mischler Effects of anthropogenic disturbance on parasitic disease prevalence This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Thomas M. Detmer
Fish, Limnology, Aquatic food webs, Stable isotopes This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Mc Cain Kevin Bracy Knight Primate conservation, Climate change, Habitat loss and fragmentation This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer
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Safran Amanda Hund Role of sexual selection and parasite resistance in mate choice This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Summer
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Safran Joanna K. Hubbard Genetic basis of color signal evolution in barn swallows This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Schmidt Courtney Naff High elevation snowfield ecology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring
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Schmidt Jack Darcy Spatial distribution of microbes, informatics and phylogenetics This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Townsend Samantha Weintraub Tropical Biogeochemistry & Ecosystem Ecology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Spring, Summer, Fall
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Biological Undergraduate Research Skills and Training (BURST)

  • BURST (Biological Undergraduate Research Skills and Training) is recommended for freshmen and sophomores to begin participating in faculty research as an assistant, although any undergraduate student may apply. With BURST, students assist faculty with their research and earn a wage of $9.00 per hour up to the amount of their award (typically $2000-$2500). Students must work 10-12 hours per week as an assistant during the academic year and 30-40 hours per week during the summer. A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required to apply. Students who have already received BURST or UROP funding once are ineligible to apply for BURST again.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)

  • UROP (Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program) requires a research proposal on a topic chosen by the undergraduate (typically a junior or senior) in consultation with a faculty member. UROP has six funding areas including assistantships, individual projects, and group projects. Each type of UROP award has a different maximum award but awards typically range from $500-$2400. Hundreds of students receive UROP funding each year and funding may be used for an honors thesis depending on the situation.
  • Like the Honors Program, we suggest you start by contacting your EBIO advisor. The advisor will be able to help you adequately prepare and plan for your UROP so that it best meets your schedule and academic goals.

 

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) at the Mountain Research Station

  • Students in the REU program participate in research projects at the Mountain Research Station. Students from both CU and other universities across the nation can apply. The REU program is designed to engage students with the scientific process at all levels, including scientific method, experimental design, fieldwork, data analysis and presentation. Participants live in cabins at the station through the summer, and are immersed in a unique, focused, research program. Visit the REU website to learn more about the program, the faculty, and the application process, or contact Dr. William Bowman (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) directly.

 

EBIO Club

  • The EBIO Club is a great way to get involved with research in EBIO as well as to meet other students with an interest in ecology and evolutionary biology. The EBIO Club organizes regular department socials with EBIO faculty and EBIO graduate student researchers to help students get involved in research projects. The Biology Club also organizes lab tours and field trips across the state of Colorado. The club provides a student voice in the department and student leadership positions are available throughout the year. To get involved please contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

MORPH: Molecular and Organismal Research in Plant History

  • The MORPH Research Coordination Network provides support for visits of undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctorals, and early career faculty (assistant professors) between organismic and molecular labs for periods ranging from a few weeks (to learn specific techniques) to a semester (to complete the equivalent of a lab rotation and take coursework not available at the home institution). This element of planned networking activities comprises the largest component of the MORPH funds and is open to any individuals with an interest in bridging the gap between organismic and molecular aspects of the evolutionary developmental biology of plants. Applications for funding are evaluated by an annually changing subcommittee appointed by the core participants of the MORPH RCN.